Tag: <span>Bye Bye</span>

I took a few days holiday last week (if you get the chance, go visit Budapest, it’s lovely) so here’s a little bit of catchup from the RSS feeds I monitor. You can download the list over on the right there.

How Corporate RSS Supports Collaboration and Innovation
Dennis McDonald pulls together some good arguments around introducing Web 2.0 ideas to your company, noting that a lot of business cases rely on raw numbers and that, in the case of social networking tools, there is:

… a disadvantage of taking a “beancounter” approach to implementing social media within an organization. While you might be able to quantify the time, effort, and technology associated with impacted processes, you can’t necessarily predict when and where the benefits (such as innovations or new ides) will occur.

Bye Bye GoLive!
Adobe finally realise what most web developers already knew, GoLive can’t compete with DreamWeaver (also now owned by Adobe). However, it’s not all bad news if you are a GoLive user:

the company will continue to support GoLive users with online tutorials and migration assistance created by usage experts. The company has also collaborated with online training service Lynda.com to provide tutorials for GoLive users.

And one more thing
The Hoefler & Frere-Jones blog continues to provide some fascinating information for typographists (?) and writers alike. This time they take a look at the many forms of the ampersand.

As for the word “ampersand,” folk etymologies abound. The likeliest account, offered by the OED, is explained by early alphabet primers in which the symbol was listed after X, Y, Z as “&: per se, and.” Meaning “&: in itself, ‘and’”, and inevitably pronounced as “and per se and”, it’s a quick corruption to “ampersand,” and the rest is history.

The Dawning of the Age of Content – and why Content Convergence Matters to You
For anyone watching the way information is now created, collated and distributed on the world wide web, this article will ring true. We ARE all watching what is going on, aren’t we?

We’re all content producers. And we’re all about to live through interesting times with the dawning of The Age of Content. Industry is discovering content as a commodity, as inventory with value, and the rules are changing fast.

The new rules are not just for high-profit content like movies and music. What was once seen as the lowliest form of commercial content within an enterprise – technical manuals, support documentation, and other business content – is starting to take its place alongside other valued corporate assets.

The 10, 20, 30 Powerpoint rule
An oldie but a goodie, it’s often quoted but it’s worth re-reading (especially as I’ve just pulled together a presentation that has.. eh… 23 slides.. ). It’s not always applicable of course but well worth keeping in mind.

It’s quite simple: a PowerPoint presentation should have ten slides, last no more than twenty minutes, and contain no font smaller than thirty points.

Summer of Doc, anyone?
Janet has a good idea for getting student technical writers (and hey why limit it?) a little bit of experience.

Now in its fourth year, Google Summer of Code supports students in writing code for participating open-source projects, which provide mentors to help guide the students’ work. Thanks to Google’s sponsorship, the students receive a stipend (making this a summer job), and mentors receive a nominal compensation for their time.

If you substitute code/documentation, developers/tech writers, Computer Science/Technical Communication, I think it’s fairly obvious that the same benefits could apply to Tech Comm students writing documentation for open source projects.

And finally a nice quote from the late great Douglas Adams:

” I love deadlines. I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by. “

Blogging

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Despite their frequent emails over the past week —with each successive email featuring more and more exclamation marks to make the point “only one day left!!!!”— I’ve dropped my blogrolling subscription. Why?

I’ll tell you why, I’m skint. No wait, that’s something else…

The reason is simply that I don’t need their services anymore. I don’t use them for this site, and I don’t use them for my own little personal “internet start page” either. Simple enough.

But it does leave me with a quandary, one which was of my own making and quite deliberately manufactured. You see, not every site showed up as being ‘updated’ in blogrolling lists, and as I tend to use the indicator as a starting point for my browsing*, so I need to find another way to see the most recently updated sites and I’m hoping that way will be either the site feeds (if offered), or software like Website Watcher.

Not sure how this one will pan out and I’ll let you over the coming weeks, but if I don’t visit YOUR site within the next fortnight then you have a clue as to why… either that or I just don’t like you…

* how do you choose what sites to visit first, always your favourites or by the ones which have updated, and if you can’t tell which is which, how do you choose?

Blogging

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Ta ta Big Blogger, it was fun. Sort of…

Yes I’ve jumped the fence and left the rest of the housemates to it, just too much going on and I can’t do it justice. If I’m honest it’s just all a bit too chaotic and random for me at the moment, but best of luck to the rest of the housemates, I’ll still be keeping an eye on the proceedings.

I think it’ll be between Vit and mike although Miss Mish has wormed her way into my affections (although I doubt she’s realised it).

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