Boxing Day Reading

I hope you all had a wonderful Christmas, now it’s time to sit back and relax, grab that turkey sandwich, and maybe a few of the following will help get you through until it’s time for a nap. Consciousness Began When the Gods Stopped Speaking Julian Jaynes was living out of a couple of suitcases in a Princeton dorm in the early 1970s. He must have been an odd sight there among the undergraduates, some of whom knew him as a lecturer who taught psychology, holding forth in a deep baritone voice. Read: http://ift.tt/1GG2bPP Dispossessed in the Land of Dreams Sometime in July 2012, Suzan Russaw and her husband, James, received a letter from their landlord asking them to vacate …

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Weekend Reading

A few of the following are hard to read, please note there may be triggering content. The Secret History of One Hundred Years of Solitude The house, in a quiet part of Mexico City, had a study within, and in the study he found a solitude he had never known before and would never know again. Cigarettes (he smoked 60 a day) were on the worktable. LPs were on the record player: Debussy, Bartók, A Hard Day’s Night. Read: http://ift.tt/1QeX8v2 There Once Was a Girl My parents have a small framed photograph of E and me in their upstairs hall. We must be 6 or 7. We are smiling in someone’s backyard, our heads damp from running through a sprinkler, …

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Weekend Reading

Commuting = reading time. Here are some of the best things I read this week. ‘Star Wars’ Strikes Back: Behind the Scenes of the Biggest Movie of the Year It is a bleak time for the Republic. It is a period of great struggle for the entire planet, and not only is the dark side winning, it’s no longer clear any other side even exists. Seriously, you guys – Earth is messed up. Just ask a polar bear, or an almond farmer, or a GOP debate moderator. Read: http://ift.tt/1N8CneN Arts & Culture Read Is it OK if you don’t know where you stand on Syria? A poll by YouGov found 1 in 4 women don’t know if they support Syrian …

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Weekend Reading

Late because I’m an idiot and set the wrong publish date…  The news this week has been, well, I’m not sure I have the words to describe how I feel about a lot of it, grim, unsettling, horrifying, tragic… I’m not sure I even have the words to express myself appropriately here. Still, the world spins on and the following (mostly) distracted me this week. 100 Women 2015: Return of a topless rebel In 2013, Tunisian feminist Amina Sboui left the country after publishing a topless photograph that caused a scandal across the Arab world. After two years in France, Amina is back in Tunis – with a new plan to stir things up. Read: http://ift.tt/1llXS4c After decades of defeat, …

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Weekend Reading

Quieter week as I’ve spent most of my time reading documents at work so a bit ‘over reader’. The Generation That Doesn’t Remember Life Before Smartphones Down a locker-lined hallway at Lawrence Central High School in Indianapolis, Zac Felli, a junior, walks to his first class of the day. He wears tortoiseshell glasses and is built like he could hit a ball hard. He has enviable skin for a teenager, smooth as a suede jacket. Read: http://ift.tt/1SJ6T29 Frankie Boyle on the fallout from Paris: ‘This is the worst time for society to go on psychopathic autopilot’ There were a lot of tributes after the horror in Paris. It has to be said that Trafalgar Square is an odd choice of …

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Weekend Reading

Obviously a lot of the focus of the news has been, rightly, the terrorist attacks in Paris, Beirut and Mali. This list feels frivolous but perhaps it’s good to ‘look away’ for a few moments. Secret Chambers, Grain Silos and the Long, Long History of Pyramid Conspiracy Theories The Giza Pyramid complex, photographed by Eduard Spelterini from a hot air balloon in 1904. (Photo: Public Domain/WikiCommons)  In 867 AD, a European monk named Bernard caught a ride on a slave ship out of the southern Italian city of Taranto. Read: http://ift.tt/1Qiq70H Noel Gallagher Is Esquire’s December Cover Star I was born in Longsight in Manchester, which is a really rough-arse part of town. They knocked our street down to build this …

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Weekend Reading

I start my new job in a week or so, not sure if that means the number of links in these posts will increase or decrease, part of me is interested to see what happens, part of me isn’t bothered, and part of me wonders why I’m telling you this. People who worry incessantly about failure could be better off than those who don’t For everyone who’s ever been told that they worry too much—here’s some deeply satisfying news for you. Worrying may be a good thing. Read: http://ift.tt/1HtzBhJ I’m worried how much time I’m spending compiling these posts, that’s a good thing, right? Meet one of the world’s most groundbreaking scientists As the dish of steamed chicken feet clattered …

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Weekend Reading

I’m realising the links I’m choosing for these posts are rapidly forming a pretty good picture of my interests, this week is no different. Why The Machines That Dig Tunnels Are Always Named After Women Tunnel Boring Machines, or TBMs, are some of the most fascinating manufacturers of our infrastructure: Two-ton primary-colored cylinders with jagged teeth that chomp through the Earth. And every single one of them has a traditionally female name. Read: http://ift.tt/1PXmOv0 Siri and Cortana Sound Like Ladies Because of Sexism Ask Siri if she’s a woman. Go ahead, try it. She’ll tell you she’s genderless. “Like cacti. And certain species of fish,” she might say. So is Amazon’s Alexa. Microsoft’s Cortana. Samsung’s S Voice. And Google Now. …

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Weekend Reading

Been hard to avoid Halloween articles this week but I’ve done my best! How Friendships Change in Adulthood In the hierarchy of relationships, friendships are at the bottom. Romantic partners, parents, children—all these come first. This is true in life, and in science, where relationship research tends to focus on couples and families. Read: http://ift.tt/1KqlqK5 Why Working Form Home Can Be Both Awesome and Awful For over a year, I worked almost exclusively from my tiny apartment in Harlem. Aside from trips into an office every six weeks or so, my work schedule and surroundings were mostly left up to me. On some days, I would fly through assignments and personal tasks with unusual efficiency. Read: http://ift.tt/1PKHlm8 The best way …

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Weekend Reading

Some cracking reads this week, some quite dark, some wonderfully uplifting and the usual nonsense in-between. The Doctor As the sun set on a Saturday in early February, Mubarak Angalo, a farmer in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains, was riding in a pickup truck with two friends. They had spent the day at a market, selling vegetables, and were returning to their village when they heard a low droning sound overhead. Read: http://ift.tt/1QoHWZ9 Out of the Darkness — Accountability for Torture — Medium THE CIA USED the music of an Irish boyband called Westlife to torture Suleiman Abdullah in Afghanistan. His interrogators would intersperse a syrupy song called “My Love” with heavy metal, played on repeat at ear-splitting volume. Read: http://ift.tt/1KeFwHa Mr. …

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