[insert large cat themed title]

      10 Comments on [insert large cat themed title]

That is a “large cat” not a “large title” that is “cat themed”. Although that would work too I guess…

Mac owners the world over know that tomorrow sees the release of the most important new piece of software for sometime. Just after Apple have released record figures which see them now positioned as the largest PC hardware manufacturer on the planet, tomorrow should add to the current buzz.

Yes, that’s right, tomorrow will see millions of fans flocking to stores to get their grubby hands on Pro Evolution Soccer 7!!

I can’t wait. I’ve read all the reviews and it looks good… Sure it will look better if you are playing it on a PS3 or XBox 360 but hey, my little PS2’s doing fine thankewevewymuch.

OK. I confess, I too am intriguingly excited about the new version of Apples OSX. Codenamed Leopard the Mac websites have been banging on about this for a while now and, frankly, I’m glad it’s almost here because it is getting a little boring. For sure there are plenty of posts about preparing for an upgrade, what will be in the upgrade, what’s good about the upgrade, what’s bad about the upgrade, and so on, but geez give it a break!

In saying that, despite the wealth of information that has been published about Leopard there is one thing which hasn’t really been taken into account, at least not that I’ve seen. There are a large number of people who will be updating their version of OSX for the first time. Like me, there are a lot of new ‘switchers’ who have probably only recently gotten to grips with OSX, and got it all tweaked as they want. What of us ohh hallowed fanboy website?

From what I can tell, you can upgrade in situ, and nothing much should break. Or you can do a fresh install which will take you back to the default settings. I’m not sure if that wipes out user accounts as well, I guess it does.

I do have a list of the apps that I’ve installed, and kept, on my MacBook and we don’t keep files on it so, other than the odd file or two, there isn’t anything on it that either of us is particularly bothered about. A clean install is the mostly likely option. However I’ll probably hold off until later on, as I don’t really need any of the new functionality… mind you, I do have a trip towards the end of November, an ideal time to play with a new OS… hmmmm.

And, of course, there is no small amount of curiosity on my part. I’ve upgraded Windows machines all way through from 3.1.1 to Windows 95 (BETA), from 95 to 2000 (thankfully never from Windows Me), and from 2000 to XP. I don’t think I’ll ever be bothering with Vista. I’m keen to see how different the process is with the Mac OS as my experience with it suggests that it will be much smoother.

What about you, fellow Mac user, are you going to be upgrading? Have you upgraded before? If so, any hints or tips for us newbies? I

10 thoughts on “[insert large cat themed title]

  1. Richard Leyton

    OS X was designed with /Applications, /System and /Users as separate directories, and self-contained too. No libraries in system directories (perhaps with the exception of device drivers, which *do* make sense there). So – as I’ve experienced once – when the OS install is hosed (because I did a silly thing) and the machine was not booting, a completely fresh install of the OS did *NOT* wipe applications or home directory, or preferences. It even politely backed up the old /System folder just in case I wanted it back…

    So it’s similar with an upgrade. You’re only upgrading /System and adding to /Applications. I suppose a few application specific preferences might change if you had to go back to Tiger, but when I’ve swapped about it’s never caused a problem.

    *so* it’ll be fine. Really. Relax. They really did a good job with their design of OS X, and it’s in big things like this that it pays off. It’s been straight forward in each upgrade I’ve done so far. Me? I’ll be upgrading quite soon. Probably this weekend.

    I’ll be taking a full backup first though, just because you only regret it afterwards if you don’t. Only the paranoid survive etc. But it’s a sensible thing to do *anyway* – much like changes the batteries in your fire alarm is too.

  2. Matt

    I think I’ll probably hold off for a while until there’s extensive “I fucked up my Leopard install – 10 tips to make sure you don’t” guides available online for Mac upgrading n00bs like me.

  3. Keith

    It realy is very simple, as I carry a large number of files on my computer I will just be doing the upgrade (this will be the 4th time I have done one) never had any problems, just back up before you start then put a movie on sit back and wait.

  4. Lesley

    I’ll be upgrading too eventually. I’m on holiday next week and I’m really quite glad because the brouhaha around the release is usually even more tedious than the build-up.

  5. James

    I signed up for the Apple Developer Select membership earlier on in the year just so I got access to the developer builds of Leopard πŸ™‚

    I ordered my family pack the day the release date was announced.

    If you absolutely must keep all of your applications and preferences then Archive & Install is the way to go when you update OS X.

    I shall be installing from scratch as I’m never that attached to the way my system ends up and can quickly get things back to the way I like them.

  6. Ian D

    I’ll be upgrading over the weekend. Backup the drive, wipe and start again. I’m sure the upgrade will work fine but that’s my preferred route and I’m sticking to it. Then once the desktop is done I’ll start on the laptop. Shouldn’t really look forward to such chores but I do.

    While it’s upgrading I’ll have a game or three on PES 7 (or 2008 if you go with official titles).

  7. Steve

    I’m a new mac owner too (thanks to a very generous wedding prezzie)…

    I’ll probably be upgrading before the year is out. Not right now due to job-switching-tight-finances, but the one thing the mac hasn’t given me is “fidget relief” – it does, as they say, just work. So, upgrading sounds like a nice, safe and (take note, Microsoft) cheap way of fidgeting!!

  8. Pete Ashton

    Have upgraded a number of times without problems but I do like to wait a bit. Apple have a tendency to be rather cutting edge at times so waiting for the .1 or .2 updates is, I think, a wise move to make sure all the bugs are ironed out. Plus that gives the 3rd party apps a chance to upgrade themselves if necessary. On the whole, though, it’s oddly remarkable.

    (Make sure you unplug any firewire / usb drives first – this has been an issue in the past)

  9. mum

    As usual bringing things down to the lowest common denominator- I gotta have one of those Glide toastie things.

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